Client:
Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research
Location:
Nedlands, Western Australia
Features:
The 10-storey building includes five levels of PC2 OGTR laboratory space with general and specialist support labs; imaging facilities, a bioresource facility, clinical research areas; offices, hot desks and workstations; seminar facilities, video conferencing facilities, 250 seat auditorium; informal and formal meeting spaces; quiet spaces, interaction areas, staff amenities, end-of-trip facilities, cafe, demonstration lab, community resource facility, gallery and exhibition installations. Each lab floor accommodates 100 researchers in lab space and dry space with interaction areas located centrally. The building is organised with a strong vertical integration and visual connection between research floors, and an innovative floor plate designed to maximise collaboration and flexibility.
Awards:
AIA WA The Jeffrey Howlett Award for Public Architecture - 2014
AIA WA Architecture Award for Interior Architecture - 2014

Western Australia is home to two Nobel in Medicine Laureates and some of Australia’s brightest scientific minds in the field of medical research. The new headquarters for the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research (previously known as WAIMR) is at the heart of the state’s premier new research precinct on the QEII Medical Centre.

The Harry Perkins Institute in Perth houses over 700 researchers and exemplifies a new collaborative and interactive model in the joint use of space and technology. The PC2 OGTR laboratory space was designed to be generic in planning and function in order to support research interests rather than territorial silos. Labs are open with excellent light and aspect and avoid segregating areas for specific user groups. High investment instruments and facilities were centralised.


Hames Sharley’s architectural team conducted extensive research including interstate and international study tours and input from respected collaborators to produce an innovative class leading building. The building is organised with a strong vertical integration and visual connection between research floors, and an innovative floor plate designed to maximise collaboration and flexibility. The innovative inclusion of community education facilities has been supported by a $5.4 million Lotterywest Grant.

“Large buildings require multiple rounds of design iteration, and a close relationship between the client and architects so that both end up on the same page with the final design, costings and the desired outcome. Hames Sharley has worked closely with the Institute for years in that relationship which has worked superbly throughout. High quality leadership has helped steer the project and deliver a very high quality product – each of the two buildings has ended up brilliantly. “ Prof Peter Leedman, Director Designate.